2021 Guide to the Night Sky: A month-by-month guide to exploring the skies above Britain and Ireland

2021 Guide to the Night Sky: A month-by-month guide to exploring the skies above Britain and Ireland

Storm Dunlop, Wil Tirion, Royal Observatory Greenwich

$5.99

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Description

“This is a great guide to the night sky at a great price”Astronomy Now

“A handy and straightforward guide … attractive little booklet” British Astronomical Association's 'Journal'

“an ideal Christmas stocking-filler” The Observatory

From the Number One Astronomy publisher, the bestselling stargazing handbook to the planets, stars and constellations visible from the northern hemisphere. 6 pages for each month covering January–December 2021.

An easy introduction to astronomy and a useful reference for seasoned stargazers. Now includes a section on comets and a map of the moon.

Designed for Britain and Ireland but usable anywhere in the world between 40°N and 60°N, covering most of Europe, southern Canada and the northern United States.

Written and illustrated by astronomical experts, Storm Dunlop and Wil Tirion, and approved by the astronomers of the Royal Observatory Greenwich.

Content includes:

• Advice on where to start looking

• Easy-to-use star maps for each month with descriptions of what to see

• Positions of the moon and visible planets

• Details of objects and events you might see in 2021

• Now in three editions: Britain and Ireland; North America; Southern Hemisphere.


Author

Storm Dunlop:

Storm Dunlop is an experienced Astronomy and meteorology author and
translator. Books include Clouds (Haynes, 2019), Gem Weather (Collins,
2012), How to Read the Weather (National Trust, 2018), Meteorology
Manual (Haynes, 2014), Practical Astronomy (Philip’s, 2012) and is the
lead author for the bestselling annual Guide to the Night Sky (Collins).
Fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society, the Royal Meteorological
Society and a member of the International Astronomical Union.

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Wil Tirion was trained in graphic arts and has always had an interest in astronomy and especially star charts. In 1983 he became a self-employed full time Uranographer. Since then he has contributed to many atlases, books and magazines. In 1987 he received the ‘Dr. J. van der Bilt-prize’, a Dutch award for amateur astronomers. In 1993 this was followed by a second, more international ‘award’, when a minor planet was named after him: (4648) Tirion = 1931 UE.

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The Royal Observatory, Greenwich is the home of Greenwich Mean Time and the Prime Meridian of the World, making it the official starting point for each new day and year. It is also home to London's only planetarium, the Harrison timekeepers and the UK's largest refracting telescope. It runs the annual Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition.

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